Exhibition

Tommy Stockel: Simulation & Decoration

Press Release

PRESS RELEASE

Tommy Støckel's exhibit, Simulation & Decoration, will consist of collages that refer to his main installation, an expanse of gridded boxes that appear to be cubby holes or miniature rooms - some empty, others featuring a lone person. Each square in his grids has lines and shadings that give either a sense of depth or convexity. When figures appear, the boxes become deep observation modules with the inhabitants on stage, simulating representatives of a somewhat global population - athlete, maid, musician, policman, sheikh. However, it is up to viewers to determine whether the figures are posing or actually observing us - their world simulating ours - or whether they are part of the room's decor. Empty boxes may fool the eye and push out into the space as a pure optical illusion, embellishing the texture of the grid's geometric appeal. Støckel has a knack for integrating tricks of perception with micro and macro principles to shrink or expand his forms, delighting and engaging viewers.

Tommy Støckel was born in 1972, in Copenhagen, Denmark, and lives and works in Berlin. He studied at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Art in Copenhagen and has exhibited extensively around the world. This is his second exhibition at the Rena Bransten Gallery.

PRESS RELEASE

Tommy Støckel's exhibit, Simulation & Decoration, will consist of collages that refer to his main installation, an expanse of gridded boxes that appear to be cubby holes or miniature rooms - some empty, others featuring a lone person. Each square in his grids has lines and shadings that give either a sense of depth or convexity. When figures appear, the boxes become deep observation modules with the inhabitants on stage, simulating representatives of a somewhat global population - athlete, maid, musician, policman, sheikh. However, it is up to viewers to determine whether the figures are posing or actually observing us - their world simulating ours - or whether they are part of the room's decor. Empty boxes may fool the eye and push out into the space as a pure optical illusion, embellishing the texture of the grid's geometric appeal. Støckel has a knack for integrating tricks of perception with micro and macro principles to shrink or expand his forms, delighting and engaging viewers.

Tommy Støckel was born in 1972, in Copenhagen, Denmark, and lives and works in Berlin. He studied at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Art in Copenhagen and has exhibited extensively around the world. This is his second exhibition at the Rena Bransten Gallery.

PRESS RELEASE

Tommy Støckel's exhibit, Simulation & Decoration, will consist of collages that refer to his main installation, an expanse of gridded boxes that appear to be cubby holes or miniature rooms - some empty, others featuring a lone person. Each square in his grids has lines and shadings that give either a sense of depth or convexity. When figures appear, the boxes become deep observation modules with the inhabitants on stage, simulating representatives of a somewhat global population - athlete, maid, musician, policman, sheikh. However, it is up to viewers to determine whether the figures are posing or actually observing us - their world simulating ours - or whether they are part of the room's decor. Empty boxes may fool the eye and push out into the space as a pure optical illusion, embellishing the texture of the grid's geometric appeal. Støckel has a knack for integrating tricks of perception with micro and macro principles to shrink or expand his forms, delighting and engaging viewers.

Tommy Støckel was born in 1972, in Copenhagen, Denmark, and lives and works in Berlin. He studied at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Art in Copenhagen and has exhibited extensively around the world. This is his second exhibition at the Rena Bransten Gallery.

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